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COVID-19 update, June 22, 2020:

SUMS aims to safely support the campus research restart under Stanford's Stage 2 physical distancing rules.  Meetings and seminars continue to be held via Zoom.  Email us at spectrometry@stanford.eduMore info

Events

SUMS Seminar Series
Online Thursdays, noon-1 pm

see below for seminar info and registration 

Note: In response to COVID-19 concerns, the seminars are being held online;
Please register for individual seminars to get Zoom connection info

Thursday September 24, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

The role of host arginases in murine malaria

Nicole Davis, PhD - Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
Register here

Malaria, a deadly disease caused by Plasmodium parasites, remains a global health threat. Vascular distress in malaria is thought to be caused by depletion of the vasodilator nitric oxide and its amino acid precursor arginine. Arginine is depleted in the plasma of malaria patients, but the causes of hypoargininemia remain incompletely understood. We sought to determine the cause(s) of arginine deletion in a Plasmodium chabaudi murine model of malaria. In a metabolic survey of P. chabaudi-infected mice, we noted an inverse relationship between plasma arginine and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), a plasma marker for hepatocellular injury. Injured hepatocytes also release arginine-consuming arginase-1 (Arg1) into circulation, which suggested that hepatic Arg1 could deplete arginine following malaria-induced liver injury. We used computational and host genetic tools in combination with LC-MS to test the extent to which hepatic Arg1 and other host arginases deplete plasma arginine during malaria. We found that hepatic Arg1 provided a partial explanation for arginine depletion in P. chabaudi infection, and it may explain arginine depletion in some human populations. Collectively, our work motivates increased attention to the role of malarial liver damage in disrupting host arginine metabolism.

 

Thursday October 1, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Reasons to be excited about current efforts in glycoproteomics

Nick Riley, PhD - Dept. of Chemistry, Stanford University
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
Register here

Glycoproteomics is a rapidly developing field, driven by improvements in sample preparation, instrumentation, and post-acquisition software. Recent years have ushered in a wave of new glycoproteomics studies, both as mass spectrometrists learn how to best apply their expertise to the needs of glyco-analysis and as MS methods become more democratized for glycobiologists to use. Here we will cover new developments in 1) preparation of glycoproteomic samples, 2) quantitation strategies used for glycopeptide characterization, 3) the most useful data acquisition strategies for various types of glycopeptides, 4) software for interpretation of glycopeptide spectra, and 5) tools for data visualization and meta-analysis. It will be difficult for this overview to be truly comprehensive or thoroughly detailed, but the hope is that this discussion will provide a springboard to generate more interest in glycoproteomic advances and will point interested parties to relevant starting points for continued learning.

 

Thursday October 15, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Calcineurin phosphatase activity regulates Varicella-Zoster Virus induced cell-cell fusion

Momei Zhou, PhD - Dept. of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
Register here

Cell-cell fusion (abbreviated as cell fusion) is a characteristic pathology of medically important viruses, including varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the causative agent of chickenpox and shingles. Cell fusion is mediated by a complex of VZV glycoproteins, gB and gH-gL, and must be tightly regulated to enable skin infection. Although the function of gB and gH-gL in the regulation of cell fusion has been explored, whether host factors are directly involved in this regulation process is unknown. Here, we discovered host factors that modulated VZV gB/gH-gL mediated cell fusion via high-throughput screening of bioactive compounds with known cellular targets. Calcineurin, a cellular phosphatase, was singled out for study and was demonstrated to regulate gB/gH-gL mediated cell fusion via compounds that bind to FKBP1A, which specifically inhibit calcineurin phosphatase activity, led to remarkably enhanced cell fusion. Consistent with a broad role in fusogen modulation, inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase activity enhanced both herpes simplex virus-1 and synctin-1 mediated cell fusion. Further supporting the role of calcineurin phosphatase activity, inhibitor-induced enhanced cell fusion was significantly reduced by FKBP1A knockdown. Importantly, inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase activity during VZV-infection caused exaggerated syncytia formation and suppressed virus propagation, which was consistent with previous studies. Phosphopeptide enrichment and Orbitrap mass spectrometry identified seven host cell proteins that remained uniquely phosphorylated when calcineurin phosphatase activity was inhibited. This suggests that the dephosphorylation of one or more of those seven proteins is required for calcineurin-dependent fusion regulation. These findings demonstrate that calcineurin is a critical host cell factor pivotal in the regulation of VZV induced cell fusion, which is essential for VZV pathogenesis.


Webinars Available On-Demand

Thursday September 3, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Fundamentals: An introduction to MS-based glycoproteomics

Nick Riley, PhD - Dept. of Chemistry, Stanford University
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar

Protein glycosylation is a prevalent, yet heterogeneous co- and post-translational modification (PTM). Glycosylation mediates biophysical and biochemical interactions both intra- and extracellularly, with roles ranging from structural stability, immune regulation, cell proliferation, and intercellular dynamics (to name a few). Similar to other PTMs, e.g., phosphorylation and acetylation, mass spectrometry is the premier method to map site of glycosylation, but challenges inherent to the heterogeneity of glycosylation (in both the glycans that modify proteins and the sites that are modified) make glycoproteomics significantly more difficult. Here we will discuss fundamental mental characteristics of several classes of protein glycosylation, including N-glycosylation and two different types of O-glycosylation (O-GlcNAc vs. mucin-type/O-GalNAc). We will also cover standard workflows used in the field, covering protease considerations, enrichment options, LC-MS/MS methods, and well-established analysis tools. Importantly, we will address shortcomings and challenges that remain in glycoproteomics, too. Glycoproteomics data will be discussed in context with other -omics efforts, e.g., glycomics and standard proteomics, with the ultimate goal that MS researchers unfamiliar with the glyco world will be able to appreciate nuances required in glycosylation analysis.

 

Thursday July 23, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Mass Spec Fundamentals: what you didn’t know you needed to know

Speaker: Ryan Leib, PhD
View recorded webinar
Download .pdf of slides
 

An encore performance of the inaugural seminar of our Fundamentals Series!  In case you missed it in-person, we are streaming and recording this essential presentation.  This seminar will cover the basic foundations of ion generation, manipulation, and detection in a typical LC/MS experiment, and why it matters to your research.  This is a great jumping on point for scientists new to mass spectrometery who are excited to learn a bit about the underlying physical processes that make these experiments possible.

Thursday July 16 - SUMS Seminar Series

Improved protein and PTM characterization with a practical electron-based fragmentation on Q-ToFs and ion mobility separations

Joe Beckman, PhD - Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry, Oregon State University, CEO of e-MSion, Inc.
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar

Download .pdf of slides
 

Electron-induced fragmentation (ExD) is well known to produce uncluttered spectra of entire proteins with labile post translational modifications preserved, but has not been practical in most mass spectrometers. We have developed an efficient ExD device that can be retrofitted into Q-ToFs and Orbitrap QE instruments.  Once the ECD cell has been optimized to maximize fragmentation of small peptides like substance P, the same parameters also work with slight adjustments for fragmenting native and unfolded proteins. Nearly complete sequence coverage was obtained with “native”-folded proteins. ECD also efficiently cleaves disulfide bonds within proteins to increase coverage.  Sequence coverage of 80-95% was obtained for small proteins like ubiquitin and a-synuclein (14 kDa) during UPLC separations from chromatographic peaks lasting 3-5 seconds. For carbonic anhydrase (29kDa), sequence coverage as 93% (half of the human proteome is smaller than 30kDa). Approximately 90% sequence coverage for each of the three subunits from 0.1 ug of an IdeS-digested antibody was obtained in a five-minute nanoflow separation. The protein spectra consisted primarily of c and z ions, though the ECD cell also produced a substantial number of d and w sidechain fragments. These side-chain fragments allow leucine/isoleucine and isoaspartate/aspartate pairs to be distinguished, which facilitates de novo sequencing. Labile post-translational modifications are also retained, including phosphorylation, glycation and deuterium incorporation. Deuterium labeling of ubiquitin enabled top-down hydrogen/deuterium exchange with residue-specific resolution at rates consistent with NMR. The copper and zinc cofactors in superoxide dismutase (17 kDa) remained bound to their respective binding sites in ECD fragments. The simplified fragmentation patterns made possible with the ExD cell allows existing mass spectrometers to characterize mid-sized proteins even using fast front-end separations including ion mobility separations.  Because the ExD cell supports collisional ion activation and unfolding, more complete sequence coverage can be achieved for large native protein complexes than previously possible on any instrument.

Thursday July 9, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

In-depth shotgun triacylglyceride profiling

Matias Cabruja, PhD - Dept. of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar
Download .pdf of slides

 

Triacylglycerides (TAG) levels are associated with metabolic (e.g. diabetes) and cardiovascular diseases. TAG detailed analysis might be important to better understand their biological properties and their roles in health and disease states. Comprehensive TAG content characterization is methodologically challenging due to the high complexity and similarity. Current high-throughput targeted methods only inform on one fatty acid chain while single species quantification requires extensive LC separations or highly sophisticated (Tribrid) spectrometers. We have developed a high-throughput method to quantify individual TAG species using shotgun MS3.

Brought to you in conjunction with Sciex

Thursday July 2, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Fundamentals: Bioanalytical LC/MS method validation -- fit for purpose

Ludmila Alexandrova, PhD
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar
Download .pdf of slides

 

With the increasing importance of research reproducibility and requirements of peer-reviewed scientific journals, the reliability of bioanalytical data and the value of method validation cannot be underestimated.  Unreliable results are subject to misinterpretation and can lead to project failure.  At the same time, extensive method validation is a complicated and time-consuming process and is not to be undertaken lightly.  This seminar will provide an overview of validation guidelines, requirements, approaches, workflow, and data analysis.  Case studies will illustrate the fit-for-purpose concept -- suiting the level of validation to the intended purpose of the study.  Please bring your questions and suggestions.

Thursday June 25 - SUMS Seminar Series

ASMS review: recap the reboot!

Zoom meeting, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar

What caught your eye at ASMS?  What are your take-homes?  Which presentations would you recommend to others?  Join us to recap the reboot -- compare notes, share highlights, and discuss developments of interest.  With recorded content online until August 31st, get the inside scoop on which sessions to watch on-demand.

June 1-19, 2020 - ASMS & Short Courses

Seminar series is on hiatus during the online ASMS Reboot

https://asms.org/conferences/asms-2020-reboot/

Thursday May 28 - SUMS Seminar Series

Mass spec bloopers!  And other amusing adventures

The lighter side of mass spec.  A collection of the weird and the wonderful -- we couldn't make this stuff up if we tried!

Hear from our intrepid crew:

  • David Quilici, University of Nevada, Reno
  • Brett Phinney, University of California, Davis
  • Kimberly Lee, Cell Signaling Technology
  • Toni Koller, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Allis Chien, Stanford University


Zoom meeting, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar

Thursday May 21, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Fundamentals: Applications of LC/MS in small molecule drug discovery

Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is a proven technique of choice for many assays implemented during the various stages of drug discovery and development. Join us for an overview of LC/MS applications in the drug discovery process with emphasis on metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies. We will share real-world project examples with focus on selection of suitable LC/MS instrumentation, method development approaches, sample preparation, data analysis and interpretation.

Ludmila Alexandrova, PhD
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar
Download .pdf of slides

Thursday May 14 - SUMS Seminar Series

Breakout discussion topics:

  • Implementing new technologies & techniques
    What new areas are looming on your horizon?  Think and talk through approaches to selecting, testing and onboarding new methods in a core lab environment.
     
  • Folk wisdom: sample prep, instrument operations, data analysis
    The devil is in the (unpublished) details!  Share best practices for the various stages of a mass spec experiment, both in and out of the lab.
     
  • Research restart in the COVID-19 era
    During the unfolding COVID-19 situation, universities including Stanford have ceased non-essential research activities. As we prepare to return to the lab, this forum will be an opportunity to discuss changed workflows, new laboratory safety measures, and phased research restart strategies.
     

Bring your questions, share your experiences, and learn from each other in the hosted breakout discussions; then rejoin everyone in the main meeting room for a report back on key points from each of the discussions.  Note: the breakout room discussions will not be recorded; the summary reports to the recombined group will be recorded and made available here.

Speakers: you, and many others!
Zoom meeting, noon-1 pm
View recorded discussion summary

Thursday May 7, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Fundamentals: Native mass spectrometry & relevant techniques

Beryl Xia, PhD
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar
Download .pdf of slides

 

Interested in using mass spectrometry as a tool for structural biology? Curious about emerging  approaches for protein research? This seminar will provide a broad overview of native mass spectrometry and its applications, and touch on both popular and non-commercial emerging techniques relevant to native mass spectrometry. Topics include charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS), ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX), and more.

Thursday April 30, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Fundamentals: Peptide quantitation strategies

Fang Liu, PhD; Beryl Xia, PhD
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar
Download .pdf of slides

 

A deeper dive into quantitation techniques specifically for peptides, including selected reaction monitoring (SRM), parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), TOMAHAQ, SureQuant, and more.

Thursday April 23, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Fundamentals: Measuring concentrations of small molecules using mass spectrometry - theory and practice, part II

Karolina Krasinska, MS
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar
Download .pdf of slides


Part II, with emphasis on the practice: How can I measure concentrations of specific molecules in my sample? What are the possible approaches and how do I determine which one is best for my application?  What do I need to consider when planning such a project? This seminar will answer these questions and more, explaining mass spectrometry-based targeted quantitation from the ground up.  Learn about common pitfalls and strategies to navigate around them. Gain practical tips on data analysis and what your data can and can’t tell you. Bring your questions, learn from your fellow researchers’ questions, and come away with a solid grounding in this core analytical technique.

Thursday April 16, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Fundamentals: New proteomic approaches and essential data handling tips

Kratika Singhal, MS; Rowan Matney, BA
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar
Download .pdf of slides

 

Get the inside scoop on both ends of proteomic workflows: from sample prep approaches for experiments like TMTPro-16plex, phosphoproteomics and SureQuant, to what to do with your data once the results are in.

Thursday April 9, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Fundamentals: Intact protein mass spectrometry - tips and best practices

Theresa McLaughlin, MS
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar

Download .pdf of slides

Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for analyzing intact proteins.  This seminar will focus on recommendations and practical considerations for success.  Which instruments should you use? How much sample is required? What buffer components can be tolerated?  Which modifications can be detected? How is the data analyzed? We will answer these questions and cover details of the ESI-LC/MS methods used at SUMS for intact protein MW determination.

Thursday April 2, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Fundamentals: Measuring concentrations of small molecules using mass spectrometry - theory and practice, Part I

Karolina Krasinska, MS
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar

Download .pdf of slides

How can I measure concentrations of specific molecules in my sample? Can I use a mass spectrometer to analyze my samples of interest?  What mass spectrometers are best suited for this purpose? What are the possible approaches and how do I determine which one is best for my application?  What do I need to consider when planning such a project? This seminar will answer these questions and more, explaining mass spectrometry-based targeted quantitation from the ground up.  Learn about common pitfalls and strategies to navigate around them. Gain practical tips on data analysis and what your data can and can’t tell you. Bring your questions, learn from your fellow researchers’ questions, and come away with a solid grounding in this core analytical technique.

Thursday March 26, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Fundamentals: Quantitation strategies in mass spectrometry-based proteomics

Fang Liu, PhD
Zoom webinar, noon-1 pm
View recorded webinar
Download .pdf of slides

This seminar will cover the most commonly used methods for mass spectrometry‐based quantification in proteomic applications. Quantification can be performed using either unlabeled or labeled approaches. Advantages and disadvantages, including quantification accuracy and reproducibility, will be discussed for each type of approach. This is a great opportunity for scientists who are new to mass spectrometry to learn about options available in qualitative and quantitative proteomics, and which method to choose for their research applications.

Sponsor: PharmaFluidics

Mythbusters at SUMS

Episode 135: Hidden Nasties, air date 12/16/09

Mythbusters Episode 135

Event Archive

Thursday March 12, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Analyzing the volatilome via Secondary Electro-Spray Ionization (SESI): Technical development and its application to breath and microbial VOCs

Dr. Guillermo Vidal-de-Miguel, CEO, Fossil Ion Technology
Prof. Jiangjiang Zhu, Ohio State University

Thursday Free Lunch Seminar, noon-1 pm
Bass Biology 122

Sponsor: Diagnose Early Inc.

The metabolome is very dynamic, with many molecules being continuously absorbed, synthesized, and degraded in response to the environment and other endogenous stimuli. Its volatile fraction (the volatilome) is available non-invasively, but relevant metabolites tend to be very diluted. Secondary Electro-Spray Ionization (SESI) enables the real-time analysis of biologically relevant metabolites with very low vapor pressures at minute concentrations. This enabled applications like breath analysis for biomarker discovery, pharmacokinetic profiling, and micro-organism monitoring. This presentation will be divided into two: the technical development of SESI and its application to breath analysis, and the detection and monitoring of microbial VOCs for human health studies. A Super SESI instrument will be available in the laboratory for demonstration.

Thursday February 27, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

Capillary Electrophoresis coupled to Mass Spectrometry: Is the combination of exceptional speed, resolution and identification the holy grail of molecule characterization and monitoring?

Bill McCrea, MS
Thursday Free Lunch Seminar, noon-1 pm
Bass Biology 122

Capillary electrophoresis has been a trusted and highly valued technology for many years due to the exceptional speed and resolution of the separations.  Unfortunately, the electrolytes and additives that make it so effective have traditionally limited CE to optical detection methods requiring additional analyses to determine absolute identification.  The development of microfluidic ZipChip technology has resulted in highly efficient separations of both large and small molecules using ESI compatible background electrolytes.  The combination of high-resolution CE separations and high-resolution mass spectrometric detection provides absolute identification with extremely fast runtimes for a variety of molecules in a wide range of matrices.  Add into the equation nano-scale flow rates and nanoliter sample consumption -- is this the holy grail of analytical workflows?

Bill McCrea received his MS in Synthetic Chemistry from Montana State University and spent over 15 years in the biotech and pharmaceutical industries developing oncology drugs.  During this time, It became clear that advanced technologies and instrumentation were the secret to improved efficiencies and getting more effective drugs to humans faster.  Helping researchers on the front line of drug research, discovery and development get the most useful tools to overcome challenges and impact their research has become an obsession.

Sponsor: 908 Devices

February 19, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

High Resolution Ion Mobility Spectrometry and IMSn from Monosaccharides to Protein Complexes

Andy Baker, PhD
Wednesday Free Lunch Seminar, noon-1 pm
Bass Biology 121

Over the past two decades ion mobility (IM) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) has evolved into an enabling analytical technique widely utilized in research areas ranging from small molecule structural elucidation to the detailed analysis of large protein complexes. A novel circular mobility separator allows scalable pathlength and enables very high (500+) resolution IMS experiments.  In addition to the high mobility resolution, a number of novel experiments, including pre- and post mobility- fragmentation and IMSn experiments can be used to investigate ion structures. Selected examples of these experiments will be presented using model systems including nucleotides, sugars, proteins and small molecule imaging.

Andy Baker received his Ph.D in Analytical Chemistry from Indiana University working with Milos Novotny at the interface between problems of biochemical significance, high resolution chromatographic techniques, and mass spectrometric techniques. He is currently a Consulting MS Applications Scientist at Waters focusing on LC/MS/MS and LC/IMS/MS techniques for the characterization of target components from complex mixtures in both targeted and untargeted (‘OMIC) workflows.

Sponsor: Waters

January 22, 2020 - SUMS Seminar Series

LC/MS Analysis with Protein Metrics - The Basic, Best Practices, and Tips-n-Tricks

Speakers: Claire Bramwell, PhD; Maria Basanta-Sanchez, PhD; Marshall Bern, PhD; Eric Carlson, PhD
Wednesday Free Lunch Seminar, noon-1 pm
Bass Biology 121

Does your research rely on LC/MS analysis?  Do you spend long hours on data analysis?   Protein Metrics offers a broad set of solutions for post-data acquisition analysis covering a wide range of use cases and workflows.   Come learn about various basics and some best practices for your proteomics MS/MS searches, analyses of cross-linking, detailed PTMs, ways of doing reporting, or simply some Tips-N-Tricks.   Bring your data and we'll spend some time answering questions and helping you learn how to analyze your data better.

Sponsor: Protein Metrics

December 11, 2019 - SUMS Seminar Series

Mass Spec Fundamentals: what you didn’t know you needed to know

Speaker: Ryan Leib, PhD
Wednesday Free Lunch Seminar, noon-1 pm
Bass Biology 121

This seminar will cover the basic foundations of ion generation, manipulation, and detection in a typical LC/MS experiment, and why it matters to your research.  This is a great jumping on point for scientists new to mass spectrometery who are excited to learn a bit about the underlying physical processes that make these experiments possible.

This is the first in a series of Fundamentals seminars; future presentations will cover other critical topics like experimental design, data analysis, and statistical modeling approaches to mass spectrometry results.

Sponsor: ThermoFisher Scientific

November 13, 2019 - SUMS Seminar Series

SpatialOMx offers highest cellular sensitivity and specificity for molecular analysis of tissue

Shannon Cornett, PhD - Imaging/MRMS Applications Manager, Bruker Daltonics
Wednesday Free Lunch Seminar, noon-1 pm
Bass Biology 121

Abstract: LC-MS analyses of tissue homogenates identify a wide range of compounds extracted from all cell phenotypes in the homogenate.  Often, however, signals originating from discrete cells cannot be distinguished from signals from other cell phenotypes in the tissue.  MALDI Imaging is a molecular mapping tool which captures molecular signals directly from tissue and has been shown to differentiate cell phenotype even when histological analysis is indeterminate.  Combined, the two techniques enable a SpatialOMx approach to studying molecular changes in tissue.  Learn how timsTOF fleX with its dual ESI/MALDI ion source powers MALDI guided SpatialOMx to offer the most specific molecular insight into cellular processes.

Sponsor: Bruker

October 30, 2019 - SUMS Seminar Series

Atmospheric Ion Mobility Spectrometry - Applications for Macromolecular Analysis
Dr. Henry Benner - CEO, IonDx
 

Wednesday Free Lunch Seminar, noon-1 pm
Bass Biology 121

Abstract: Regulatory agencies require biotech organizations to perform detailed structural analysis of their biotherapeutics. This involves primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structural assessment. The majority of higher order structural analytics rely on indirect biophysical techniques because x-ray crystallography is not easily implemented in biotherapeutic workflows. A well-recognized technical challenge is to screen and fingerprint protein structures more rapidly. In this seminar we will provide background information on atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), an emerging analytical technology attempting to address this concern. We will showcase historical applications as well as recent research work on various classes of proteins, including monoclonal antibodies. We hope that this scientific webinar will introduce the audience to IMS and provide a forum for discussing potential applications for studying various protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid structures and other exciting modalities.

Sponsor: IonDX

2019 Stanford University Mass Spectrometry Research Applications Symposium (SUMS-RAS)

October 10, 2019
Arrillaga Alumni Center
Details

2018 Stanford University Mass Spectrometry Research Applications Symposium (SUMS-RAS)

October 4, 2018
Arrillaga Alumni Center
Details

2017 Stanford University Mass Spectrometry Research Applications Symposium (SUMS-RAS)

October 26, 2017
Arrillaga Alumni Center
Details

2016 Stanford University Mass Spectrometry Research Applications Symposium (SUMS-RAS)

October 6, 2016
Arrillaga Alumni Center
Details

2015 Stanford University Mass Spectrometry Research Applications Symposium (SUMS-RAS)

October 29, 2015
Arrillaga Alumni Center
Details

2014 Stanford Mass Spectrometry Users' Meeting

October 7, 2014
Arrillaga Alumni Center
Details

2013 Stanford Mass Spectrometry Users' Meeting

October 29, 2013
Arrillaga Alumni Center
Details

2012 Stanford Mass Spectrometry Users' Meeting

October 23, 2012
Arrillaga Alumni Center
Details

2011 Stanford Mass Spectrometry Users' Meeting

September 26, 2011
Arrillaga Alumni Center
Details

2010 Stanford Mass Spectrometry Users' Meeting

September 2, 2010
Braun auditorium
Details

2009 Stanford Mass Spectrometry Users' Meeting

September 3, 2009
Braun auditorium
Details

2008 Stanford Mass Spectrometry Users' Meeting

August 21, 2008
Clark Center (Bio-X) auditorium
Details

Practical Aspects of Long Column Capillary Chromatography

April 1, 2007
ABRF 2007, Tampa, FL
New Objective Users' Meeting
download.pdf

2006 Stanford Mass Spectrometry Users' Meeting

September 7, 2006
Clark Center (Bio-X) auditorium
Details

Proteomic Investigations usng a Double-vented Tetraphasic Continuous Column Approach to MudPIT Analysis (abstract)

September 10, 2006
Oral Session: The Essential Role of On-line Separations for Mass Spectrometry Based Proteomics
American Chemical Society, Fall 2006, San Francisco, CA
download.pdf

Advances in Mass Spectrometry Workflows for Proteomics - Identification, Characterization, Biomarker Discovery and Validation

May 17, 2006
Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Presented by Applied Biosystems
Details

Waters Technology Forum

May 9, 2006
Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Presented by Waters Corporation
Details

Biological Applications of Q-Tof Mass Spectrometry in an Academic Core Facility

April 25, 2006
Q-Tof Users' Meeting, Monterey, CA
Hosted by Waters Corporation
download.pdfMeeting details

Benefits and Practical Aspects of Long Column Chromatography

March 8, 2006
Web seminar
Hosted by Eksigent Technologies
 

Cleaning up MudPIT: Triphasic Traps & Long Columns

February 13, 2006
ABRF 2006, Long Beach, CA
Eksigent Users' Meeting
download.pdf

2005 Stanford Mass Spectrometry Users' Meeting

September 1, 2005
Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Sponsored by Thermo Electron Corporation
Details

Vented Column Technology Applied to Proteomic MudPIT Analysis on Long Capillary Columns

June 9, 2005
ASMS 2005, San Antonio, TX
download.pdf

Automated Direct Monitoring of H/D Exchange Reactions for Mapping Conformational Landscapes of Proteins

June 5, 2005
ASMS 2005, San Antonio, TX
Advion Users' Meeting
download.pdf

An Evaluation of Extended Length Reverse Phase Capillary Columns for Simple LC/MS Peptide Mapping and for Complex Proteomic Separations

May 26, 2004
ASMS 2004, Nashville, TN
download.pdf

Mass Spectrometry & Stanford Chemistry

November 21, 2003
Stanford Dept. of Chemistry
download.pdf